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Art Therapy

Who Needs Hair?

A bright watercolor and collage by Ann Cleary.
December 2016 Vol 2 No 6
Ann Cleary
Farmington, MI

The painting is watercolor and collage. I wanted to express how I felt, trying to make the best of being bald. The woman’s face is not happy, because this is not a gleeful experience, and the cap and feather added a bit of frivolity that is often not felt. I chose light, soft colors and some sparkle to offer hope and uplift spirits. 

I plan to donate the painting to the infusion center where I received treatment and stared at blank white walls for hours for 1 year.  

I hope the painting will offer a diversion and hope, and perhaps a wry smile for patients who receive treatment at the center. 

Cancer sucks, hugs heal. And art makes us feel better for a while.  

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Last modified: October 5, 2017

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