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Nutrition & CancerPreventionWellness Corner

Diet and Cancer Prevention

Results of a new study published in Nature suggest that avoiding a protein called asparagine, may help to prevent the spreading of triple-negative breast cancer to other organs in the body.
February 2018 Vol 4 No 1

Results of a new study published in Nature suggest that avoiding a protein called asparagine, which is found in many foods, may help to prevent the spreading of triple-negative breast cancer (a fast-growing cancer) to other organs in the body.1 Asparagine is found in large amounts in dairy, beef, fish, legumes, nuts, seeds, soy, eggs, asparagus, potatoes, poultry, and whole grains, but not in other vegetables or fruit.

Simon R.V. Knott, PhD, lead author of the study, said in a press release, “Our study adds to the growing body of evidence that suggests diet can influence the course of the disease.”

Gregory J. Hannon, PhD, another study author, added, “The study results are extremely suggestive that changes in diet might impact both how an individual responds to primary therapy and their chances of lethal disease spreading later in life.”

If these results are confirmed in humans, then avoiding the foods rich in asparagine may help prevent the spread of this deadly breast cancer. Potentially, this may also help to prevent metastatic cancer in other types of cancer, not only breast.

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