gdc
Recipe Box

Beef and Root Vegetable Stew

This hearty stew is rich in iron, vitamin C, and fiber to give you energy, boost your immune system, and help you feel satisfied. It’s a healthy way to enjoy some comfort food!
Recipe Box
Whitney Reist, RD, LMNT
Culinary Dietitian

Beef and Root Vegetable Stew highlights the bounty of winter produce in a rich and warming one-dish meal that's perfect for a cold winter's night. Make extra for the freezer and enjoy it all winter long! This hearty stew is rich in iron, vitamin C, and fiber to give you energy, boost your immune system, and help you feel satisfied. It’s a healthy way to enjoy some comfort food!

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 2 hours

Total time: 2 hours, 20 minutes

Yield: 6-8 servings

Serving size: 1 1/2 cups


Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 pounds beef stew meat, trimmed of any excess fat and cut into 1'' pieces of the same size
  • Coarse ground Kosher salt
  • Freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 medium shallot, diced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons of tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups red wine (or water)
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme (about 6 sprigs)
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  • 4-6 cups Kitchen Basics unsalted beef stock
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 3 cups 1/2'' diced butternut squash (about 1-1/2 pound squash)
  • 2 cups 1/2'' diced turnip (about 2 medium)
  • 1 cup 1/4'' diced carrot (2-3 medium)

Special Equipment:

Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed soup pot

Directions:

  1. Allow beef pieces to sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Pat dry with a paper towel to remove any excess moisture, and season liberally with salt and pepper.
  2. Heat a heavy-bottomed soup pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Once a drop of water sizzles on the bottom of the pot, add the butter and olive oil. Working in 2 batches, brown the stew meat pieces until caramelized, about 4 minutes per batch. Transfer to plate and set aside.
  3. Reduce heat to medium-low, and add the shallots. Saute until soft and translucent, Add the garlic and saute until fragrant, about 30 seconds more. Add the tomato paste, Dijon mustard, and flour to pan. Stir for about a minute before adding the wine. Using a wooden spoon, scrape up all of the brown bits from the bottom of the pot.
  4. Return the meat to the pot along with any accumulated juices. Add in the whole thyme and rosemary sprigs, 4 cups of beef stock, Worcestershire sauce, and brown sugar. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, until the meat is fork-tender, 1-1/2 hours. Add the butternut squash, turnips, carrots, and additional stock (if needed) to cover the veggies. Simmer for an additional 30 minutes until the veggies are tender. Remove the thyme and rosemary sprigs and season to taste with additional salt and pepper. Serve hot with a crusty baguette.
  5. Leftovers can be frozen, if desired, for up to 3 months.

Nutrition information (per serving): Calories: 354; total fat: 9.9g; saturated fat: 3.6g; trans fat: 0g; cholesterol: 91mg; sodium: 599mg; potassium: 873mg; total carbohydrates: 20.6g; dietary fiber: 2.6g; sugars: 7.6g; protein: 32.5g

Recipe originally published by Sweet Cayenne at http://sweetcayenne.com/beef-and-root-vegetable-stew/

Share this:

Recommended For You
Recipe Box
Summer Smoothie Selections
By Chef Ryan Callahan
These four easy-to-prepare smoothie recipes serve nourishment and summer’s fruitiest flavors for patients with cancer.
Recipe Box
Tabouleh
By Chef Ryan Callahan
This recipe is an Americanized version of the classic Mediterranean side dish, substituting couscous for the wheat, but it still maintains its texture, palate-cleansing effects, and pop of freshness.
Recipe Box
Pita
By Chef Ryan Callahan
Pitas are good with everything. Pitas are good by themselves. They are very easy to make, but they require some practice. Pro tip: Timing is the key in making the pitas poof!
Recipe Box
Falafel
By Chef Ryan Callahan
Beans are rich in protein and iron, making falafel an excellent substitute for meat. Done correctly, falafel is dense and heavily spiced. Try this recipe for a savory and aromatic treat!
Last modified: May 8, 2018

Subscribe to CONQUER: the patient voice magazine

Receive timely cancer news & updates, patient stories, and more.

Country