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Art Therapy

The Light at the End of the Journey

William and Penny Hamilton created this beautifully symbolic art piece, which celebrates their warm bond together and represents the various stages of dealing with a cancer diagnosis.
April 2017 Vol 3 No 2
William Hamilton, JD, PhD

The white frame represents the time when we, as a married couple, were innocent of the disease, and what was about to happen to us. The black stands for the despair that accompanies a cancer diagnosis. The red represents the anger that comes from trying to live a healthy life and still being stricken with this disease. The purple stands for academe and the medical research that may lead not just to a cure, but to prevention as well. The gold is for the hope that springs eternal in every heart. The gray path stands for the uncertainty that is always with those trying to find their way forward to a cure. The bright light spilling out the open door is the hopeful prospect of being able to defeat the disease. The couple, walking hand-in-hand, symbolizes the loving teamwork that makes the difficult journey so much easier to bear. 

About the Artists

Concept: By Penny R. Hamilton, PhD
Design and painting: By William A. Hamilton, JD, PhD
Framing: By Lauren Gompertz-Norby of Rocky Mountain Interiors

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Last modified: January 9, 2018

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